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Here’s the complete picture of what a tankless water heater costs

By now, you’ve probably heard about tankless water heaters. Also known as “demand-type” systems, these water heaters are capable of providing your home with limitless hot water, greater energy-efficiency, and even space savings. However, homeowners most want to know what a new tankless water heater costs.

In this blog, we’re going to dive into both the short-term and long-term pictures of what a tankless water heater costs relative to a standard water heater. Our goal is to paint a complete picture of what getting a demand-type system will entail.

For a quote on a new tankless water heater here in Buffalo and Western New York, contact the team at Reimer.

Pictured: Two tankless water heaters. In this blog, we break down what a tankless water heater costs.Higher upfront costs, but savings for years to come

A tankless water heater costs typically more than a standard water heater. Just how much more can greatly depend on the brand or type (gas / electric) being compared, but—on average—it’s not unusual for a tankless unit to cost twice or three times as much as a “tanked” water heater.

Yet, just looking at these upfront costs doesn’t tell the complete story. In many cases, upgrading to a tankless water heater means you’ll come out ahead. Let’s explain:

Energy-Efficiency

Tankless heaters are about 30% more efficient at heating water for your home than a standard unit. In fact, the U.S. Department of Energy estimates that switching from standard to tankless can save homeowners, on average, about $100 a year. That number increases as you use more hot water; larger families with large hot water needs will likely see more savings.

“$100 a year,” you might say. “That doesn’t seem like all that much.” Sure, but consider this: your tankless water heater will likely last about 20-25 years before needing to be replaced. That’s $2,000 – $2,500 in savings over the lifespan of the system. In many cases, that’s more than the initial difference in price between a standard and an upgraded system.

Of course, that long system life has another advantage for your bottom-line:

Longevity

Tanked water heaters just aren’t made to last. That’s not a knock on manufacturers: it’s just that the constant combination of heat, metal, pressure, and water is inevitably headed for system failure at one point or another.

If you want to get down to what a tankless water heater costs, think about lifespan. A tanked system may last anywhere from 8-12 years (possibly longer than that, but efficiency might take a huge dip in the back-half of the system’s life). A tankless system typically lasts between 20 and 25 years.

Realistically, that means you could be in the position of buying two regular water heaters in the period of time you’d buy one tankless. At that point, you’re not saving all that much money with your initial decision to choose the cheaper of the two systems.

Avoiding disaster

Most homeowners don’t like to think about this, but—with a standard water heater—the potential for a tank burst always exists. Especially as they age and the anode rod corrodes fully, that combination of pressure, water, and heat on the metal can lead to hairline fractures that, left unchecked, develop into a fissure, requiring plumbing repair.

In contrast, tankless units don’t have tanks that can burst.

The difference in costs between these two types of water heaters is probably far, far less than your home insurance deductible—or the hit to your home’s market value—if you have to clean up flooding or damage from a burst tank.

Sure, there’s no price on peace of mind, but there is an actual cost-benefit to choosing a demand-type system here.

Your comfort matters, too

In this blog, we’ve made the case that tankless water heater costs aren’t always what they seem at the “sticker price” level. However, you should also consider the other benefits of a tankless system, including the main one: limitless hot water.

If you have a large family with a busy house, and you’re constantly running out of hot water in the mornings, a tankless system will make your home more comfortable and less stressful. You just can’t put a price on that.

For a detailed breakdown of tankless water heater costs, call Reimer

Interested in learning more about whether or not a demand-type system is right for your home? Contact us here at Reimer! We’re always happy to give plumbing advice to homeowners here in Buffalo and Western New York.

The Difference Between Boilers and Furnaces, Explained

Difference between boilers and furnacesHave you ever wondered what the difference between boilers and furnaces are? In this blog post, we’ll compare the two different kinds of heating systems so that you can weigh which is best for your home.

For heating system installation, call the professionals at Reimer.

The majority of homes in the US have a central heating system. But not all types of heating systems are the same. The two most common types of heating systems installed in homes today include the furnace and the boiler. Some people think that the difference between the two is just semantics. However, this is not the case.  Sure, both the systems keep the room warm, but the way that the warm air is generated is different.

Knowing the differences between a boiler and a furnace will be helpful when it comes to new heater installation.  It will also be of use when conversing with the technician about heater problems. So, what are the differences between the two? You should continue reading the article to find out.

What’s the difference between boilers and furnaces?

Boilers generate warm air through the heated water in a tank. They don’t require ducts to circulate warm air throughout the house. Instead, heated water is circulated through pipes to different end points located inside the house that are typically baseboard heaters or radiators.

Electric boilers have heating elements to heat the water, while gas heaters use jets under the tank for the same purpose. The heat is moved through the end points into the living space through radiant heat transfer – the delivery of heat by increasing the surface temperature so that it warms the nearby area.

On the other hand, furnaces use forced-air systems to generate warm air. The forced systems heat the air through a device known as heat exchangers. The heated air is then circulated inside the house through the ducts by blower fans. In electric powered furnaces, heating elements are present that create warm air, while in fuel powered furnaces the warm air is created by the gas jets.

So, which is better?

Each of the types of the heater has its own advantages and disadvantages. Boilers tend to produce cleaner heat and entail lower repair and operation costs. They also tend to be more energy efficient also as you can heat only the areas thereby saving on energy bills. This is a big difference between boilers and furnaces.

However, the problem with boilers is that they take longer to warm the room and can freeze during very low temperature. Also, boilers tend to raise humidity levels inside the house for which you need to install a separate humidifier.

Furnaces, on the other hand, have low installation costs and won’t freeze up during the winter. But they have shorter life span and require frequent repairs. Also, furnace air filter needs to be changed regularly which is not the case with boilers.

Call Reimer for heating installation in Buffalo and Western New York

Whatever heating equipment you purchase, you can ensure that it continues to operate without a major fault for a long time through regular tune-up. If you want to get in touch with experienced NATE-certified furnace repair technicians in Western New York, you can contact Reimer Home Services.

Electric Or Gas Tankless Water Heater: Which One Should You Buy?

Electric or gas tankless water heater

Deciding between an electric or gas tankless water heater? In this guide, we’ll walk you through the pros and cons of each system.

Most people tend to get confused when it comes to deciding whether to buy an electric or gas tankless water heater. Both the versions have different advantages and disadvantages.

Knowing about the pros and cons is important to make a wise purchase decision for the home. In this blog post, we’ll walk you through the pros and cons of each system.

Call Reimer for tankless water heater installation and service.

The pros and cons of gas tankless water heaters

The gas tankless water heater is run by either gas or propane.  Some models also have both propane and gas option. The reputable brand gas heaters tend to cost about $1,000 to $2000 and more. The venting requirements add to this cost of gas heaters. In some cases, you might also have to install the right size gas line for the heater.

Gas water heaters have a greater flow rate as compared to electric heaters. They can heat up to 8 GPM and more in warmer climates. Another advantage of gas heaters is that they are 10 to 20 percent less costly to operate as compared to electric heaters.

The pros and cons of electric water heaters

Electric tankless water heaters tend to be much less costly as compared to gas tankless heaters. You can find a good model electric heater for about $500 to $800. There are no requirements of venting or another gas line as is the case with gas heaters.

Operating costs of electric water heaters is high. The electric heaters use traditional electricity that is more costly than gas.

Also, in colder climates or where there is a need for high flow rate, a 200 AMP electric service needs to be installed that adds to the cost of the heater. For warmer regions, about 100 to 150 AMP electrical service is required. This is an important consideration when buying an electric heater as not all homes have such electrical service available, and upgrading can substantial add to the cost of installing the heater.

The bottom line: which is the better 0ption for the home?

After reading the above pros and cons of gas and electric tankless heaters, you should be able to make up your mind as to which is the better option of the two for you. If you have a gas line installed in your house that can support gas water heater, the best option is a gas water heater.

Also, a gas water heater is the right choice if the existing infrastructure does not support the electric power heater requirements. In such a case, a gas water heater will be better as not only the installation cost will be less but you will save money due to lower energy bills.

In all other cases, electric tankless water heater is the right choice. There is no need to install additional gas line or venting for the heater. Also, if you area suffer from gas line disruptions such as during extreme frigid months, it’s better that you install gas electric heaters.

Have Reimer help you decide between an electric or gas tankless water heater

For more information on buying the right tankless heater in Buffalo and Western New York area, you can contact Reimer Home Services.